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bjaypee
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 7:19 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

“Society must change with changing times”, comments Sumathi Halan on 'Matrimonial - Madhuve' post/page in http://www.badaga.in , with equally forceful reply from Anand Rajbelli.

That reminds me of some of the fundamental changes brought in by our great leaders in our customs in the early 19th century.

Do you know, Rao Bahadur Bellie Gowder, at that time considered ‘the Naakku Betta Raja’, brought two fundamental changes in our customs?


1) that ‘ the expenses connected with a death in a [Badaga] family would be the responsibility of the entire Village and not just that of that particular family, as expenses involved in the elaborate decoration of ‘Gudi Kattodhu’ - building a gopuram like temporary structure of the “saavu Kattilu” as well as feeding all the people attending the funeral made many a family sell whatever they had and put them in deep poverty’

2) The other major change was regarding ‘Saavu Muttodhu’ [paying respect to the deceased] - that ‘irrespective of the Village or sect [like Horuva, Gowda etc] every Badaga would touch the feet or head depending on the age of the deceased of another village. Those days, for example, even a minor from Thangadu attending the saavu of an aged Ayya at Bearhatty would touch the head by way of paying respect’ as the minor hails from a Haruva Sect of Badaga. Needless to say, it was a rediculous custom. There was a lot resistance to these changes and in fact divided the Badaga community vertically into two - Gowda Katchi and Haruva Katchi. But, see the transformation that has been brought in now.

Same was the case - resistance to change - when Rao Bahadur Ari Gowder brought in prohibition in 1920s during the British raj into Nilgiris [only place in whole of India at that time] as many families of the hill tribes were ruined by addiction to alcohol.


I am of the strong opinion that a daughter should also get equal share of the property among Badagas (though, there is a law to that effect now) and this will eliminate a lot of ‘failed marriages’ and the ‘indirect dowry system’ that is creeping in.

Also, I feel that all the restrictions imposed on women [who form 50% of any society] with respect to some aspects of a visit to ‘Hethe Gudi’ and in some rituals involved when the ‘Hethe Mane ‘ people visit any village should be removed.

After all the GREAT GODDESS HETHAY HERSELF IS A WOMAN.

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l_santhosh
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 6:49 am Reply with quoteBack to top

JP uncle,
Everyone will agree that 'Society must change with changing times'.
But actually, many people believe 'not disagreeing' equals 'agreeing'.
That, I think, is not agreeing.
When you agree, you agree to the whole idea(and the underlying meaning) of the statement...which, in this case, means embracing change. That is, if I say 'I agree'..it MUST mean 'I will change(improve) with changing times'.
Correct??

Now, to the two changes marked in RED(and prohibition)... no doubt they were revolutionary at Badaga levels...and to bring those in the early part of the last century would have asked for foresight and indomitable courage that only a visionary could have been able to muster.
As to the sects within our community mentioned in point 2, I don't have much to say - I don't believe in caste, religion and other such imaginary lines. They are, more often than not, tools in the hands of manipulating mercenaries.
May be more on that in a separate thread.

As to a daughter getting an equal share of property, it applies to all societies and there's nothing much to argue over it.
Equality does not come with an asterisk at the top right corner.

And...restrictions on women..."Hethe gudi"...I don't know much, so I didn't understand.

I'd be more interested in knowing how our Badaga youngsters of today can change with the times...in what ways?
Could you please elaborate on that also?
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bjaypee
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 7:30 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Hi Santhosh,

"...How our Badaga youngsters of today can change with the times...in what ways?... "

With referrence to your querry quoted above, there are many in my opinion but let me high light one which I consider to be very important and relevant.

That is on marriage :

The nightmare for parents having marriageable aged children is to find suitable match AMONG BADAGAS. There are many unmarried boys and girls with great looks, education, family background etc etc spread all over the world. Both the sides[boys & girls] are looking for the match - mainly based on word of mouth information. But the saddest thing is, not many 'hennu / gandhu nodudhu' is resulting in marriages. Where are we going wrong?

I am aware that there are 'matrimonial topics' in portals like badaga.org, Bangalore Badaga Association, Coimbatore Badaga association to name a few. What is the success rate?

I tried to start a FREE matrimonial thread in my websites http://www.badaga.in / http://badaga.proboards.com/. Not a SINGLE person registered. Is it our mindset ? Some sort of a fear that registering with these matrimonial portals is below our dignity? that these may be abused ??

There are many parents out there - despairing but still hoping to get ONLY a Badaga match.

The youngsters, I believe, can change this by being a bit more open and NOT FEEL DEJECTED if a couple of proposals do not result in matches.

Also, the obsession about the age. The condition that the girl should be ONLY around 20 / 22 years and the boy should not be more than 24/25 must change. For, anyone would know, the age limit goes up due to higher education and suitable employment.


More to follow ....

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Last edited by bjaypee on Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:29 pm; edited 3 times in total
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l_santhosh
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 8:38 am Reply with quoteBack to top

JP Uncle,
First, let me clear my understanding. I might have wrongly interpreted your message. You want the current youngsters to:
1. be a bit more open and
2. NOT FEEL DEJECTED if a couple of proposals do not result in matches

Through 1 , are you saying that the registration in matrimonial sites is less/nil because youngsters are not open-minded? And that they feel it is "below dignity" to register?
If yes, I would like to disagree because the current generation of youngsters is virtually living on the internet and would not consider it as "below dignity". As far as I know, none of my fellow-age-members thinks like that.
In fact in many cases , it is the parents who think that "if a boy/girl is registered in a matrimonial site, it is because the boy/girl is not attractive enough and so was not able to manage a varan".

There could be other reasons for low registration .
1. Awareness - I never knew your website. I registered in this site(but its another matter that my profile was accidentally deleted by admin).
2. Demand/ supply - There are too many guys registered and too less girls(ex. this site's matrimony).
3. Success rate - Because of point no. 1 & 2, success rate is almost zero. If that is the success rate, there is no point in registering.

Through 2, are you saying that youngsters are rushing in haste to get married because of which if a proposal fails, they are dejected?
If yes, I would like to disagree because it is just anxiety(which is natural) the first or second time that causes upset(not dejection) initially. It is not haste.
Another factor is that: I feel the way parents look for a varan is just not acceptable to youngsters . For example, I would prefer to deal directly (of course along with parents). That is if I like(based on my own interests) a girl, I will say yes, or else no -> DIRECTLY to the girl(or her family).
But many parents are different. Communication does not happen directly. If the girl's family says "hennu wants to study", then the boy has to understand that the girl did not like him...and something vice versa if the boy does not like the girl. Uff...tiring icon_confused.gif
And another thing is that "if a girl says no to a guy, it is siggu for the boy" it seems.
How laughable? If I can say no to a girl, why should a girl not say no to me?
And this is the reason talks go in a tangent(so that they will not feel hurt)...."hennu kattharAamba"..."kOosu abroad hOnAmba". icon_eek.gif

And another thing is: too many expectations(which hardly matter to youngsters) from the parents. Here is a sample:
1. America kOosu tha beku
2. hennu should be keppu & singara(that's the last thing in my mind)
3. kOosu should earn atleast 50K
4. nanga status-ga othu bappadhu
.. and a lot more silly ones...
Expectations will be there. But are these the sort of expectations to have? I think it just drives the youngsters mad(which you call dejection). I attribute this difference in thinking to what is called "generation gap".

As far as age is concerned, in our- Bygamundu- side hatties, girls' age upto 25 and boys' upto 29 are generally fine. Even parents are fine with this.

If I have misunderstood your opinion, kindly explain again.
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gopenath
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 2:21 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Dear Santosh,
Good discussions and opinions. I have to welcome it. But let me tell my opinions........... Please note that those are only opinions and may not be accurate. Lets also see that these discussions lead only to proper understanding of the current day situations and not to debate....................

You are an educated and have seen the changes in the world.............so you may be straight forward to say yes or no to a girl. Ofcourse we need to be straight forward to avoid misconceptions. But we need to remind that our badagas are well known for " MOGALAAGAARA" which means do not possess the guts to speak on face. This sounds simple but a very difficult task to remove from the villages. Thats the reason they say "HENNU KATHARAAMBA".

And more over I appreciate your intentions of having "KEPPU & SINGARA" at your least choice but how many of us really follow this, is a remarkable question.

Today marriage is being a nightmare for dear brothers who stay in villages. There may a small change in your views. Nowadays denying a girl from the boy side is rare but denying from the girl side is the most. As you said no parents are ready to marry their daughter to a person who stays in village and has less education................ This happened to my close friends and relatives whose names I do not wish to bring out.

The guys started searching girls according to their status, where I mean to say that the guys were not more than twelfth standard and did not have more than 2 or 3 acres of tea land.They were so careful that they did not go for a girl even with an ounce more. But they faced denials from everywhere. These issues are slowly and steadily causing dejections for the boys in villages. In the mean while most of the boys who are well to do are always in search of well to do girls.............. Note that there are definitely exceptions..............

Santosh, people need to face the society. They are keen in selecting their partners that they get honoured and not critisised........... This is a normal phenomena...............

While there are two extremes, there are some intermediate cases where they dont find any trouble in getting married. Examples are our brothers and sisters studying and working in Bangalore. They find their partners within no time and have enough time to know each other. Their status are always almost equal and the parents do not object and they go on with a very good life.

Now people to be considered are those who live in villages..............I really pity the situations prevailing in villages............that too especially with the boys with less education and less money...................

REALLY THERE NEED TO BE A CHANGE IN OUR SOCIETY.....................
But in which way??????????????

Open to more discussions.................... Hope I never hurt any body in my opinions............ If any , my advanced regrets................

With Love
Gopenath.
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l_santhosh
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 5:02 am Reply with quoteBack to top

I think I drifted a little bit from JP uncle's main idea in my previous post.
Gopi,
Your post helps in getting the discussion back on track.
In that respect, I think there needs to be a clear distinction as to which youngsters we are talking about.

JP uncle,
Could you please elaborate?
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bjaypee
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2008 10:27 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Hello Santhosh,

I am very happy that this topic 'Badaga Community should change with changing times' is stirring some thoughts and views. As you and Gopenath [I find you both to be very active with lots of original ideas in this forum with many posts] have suggested, let us 'discuss, deliberate, may be even disagree but not debate just for the sake of debating'.

I am from the older generation and hence my views may be a bit conservative and bound to be different from present day youngsters [who are mainly internet users].

About Maduve - Matrimonial

But there is a small caveat. Due to my job in the Indian Air Force, I have been to all over the country and in one of those lucky chances have been mostly in Delhi, Bangalore and Madras - Chennai. Though modesty forbids me from mentioning here, I am very tech savvy - B.E and MBA - [probably one of the few who is into computers and internet in a big way including Beta testing etc as a hobby] and hence consider myself to be in sync with the latest developments. Also I have educated my children in Lawrence School, graduation in best of the colleges in India and higher studies abroad, though I am from a Tamil Medium school [the great Board High School, Hubbathalai] and have visited a few countries abroad. I am mentioning these things to say that I am aware of the views of the younger generation to a great extent.

But then, I am a 'hardcore' Badaga and hope to see our community coming up in all fields, all over the world. My dream is -one day a Badaga will be an advisor to the USA President or a CEO of a world famous inc etc etc.

So, when I say that the youngsters must be more open what I mean is please remember that there are plenty of suitable girls/boys among Badagas and so make a sincere attempt / search by means of enrolling yourself in the Badaga matrimonial portals or any other means before you choose a life partner from outside. You do not have to blindly follow what your parents say but make an informed choice. Don't mix up infatuation with love and take a sensible decision. Remember marriage is 'forever'.... but it can also be very tricky.

I am, of course, acutely aware that like most of the communities in India, Badaga Community is also male dominated. The girls do not get their equal due in terms of education, property or choice of a groom for a life partner. The parents automatically assume that their choice of a boy is the most suitable and the girl is hardly given any choice or a chance to disagree. THAT, I STRONGLY FEEL, should change. Here, the mindset of parents should change with the changing times. After all, as Sumathi says, "she is going to spend her life with the man...the life you get to live only once".


Another aspect of our society which needs immediate attention is

BADAGA LANGUAGE


I notice with a lot of concern that in many Badaga families, both in hattis and outside, it has become routine or fashionable to speak either in Tamil or English. Badaga is hardly spoken. The surest way to KILL a culture with all its glorious and unique traditions is not using the language that culture is associated with.

Though not having a script, Badaga language enjoys and attracts a very special attention with the researchers. I consider Badaga to be a separate Dravidian Language, but many others, consider it to be of old Kannada dialect. So, if Kannada has been given the classical language tag by the Government of India, the older version of Kannada ie Badaga automatically deserves that honour is my argument.


So, since the destiny of 'Badaga' lies in the hands of the youth, they must make an all out attempt to speak as well as teach Badaga to their children.

As a small attempt, I have added a page, 'Learn Badaga' in my website http://badaga.in which is meant as much for non Badagas as for 'non-Badaga speaking' Badagas. For example, to highlight the beauty of Badaga, take a simple word like "GO" - hogu [go], hoppa [let us go], honay[I am going], hodhaya [did you go]?, hoidhavai ya [has she gone]?, 'hoppay - iru [wait, you can go], 'hoittu ba' [go and come back]...what a variety and such great 'word play' .....covering gender, grammar etc...


More will be added.....

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Last edited by bjaypee on Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:41 pm; edited 5 times in total
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ebhari
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 4:01 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

No Dream, too Big!

1) A Badaga - A Global Citizen.

2) A Badaga - Hardworking, diligent and intelligent, never Lazy.

3) A Badaga - Loves his life, enjoys what he is, never follows, only sets examples.

4) A Badaga - He is never too late to do what he wants to do.

5) A Badaga - A master of his own destiny.

6) A Badaga - A fighter to the core.

7) A Badaga - Ultra Modern, Simple and Humble.

V111) A Badaga - Takes pride in his Community and Civilisation.

Rgds/Hari.

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bjaypee
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:00 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Badaga community should change with changing times....

Generally, the Badaga homes are kept very neat and clean. All most all the homes in hattis are modernised with modifications making them more comfortable.

But still, there are a large number of homes that DO NOT HAVE TOILETS.

Thus, forcing the inmates to 'do the job' in open air called 'kaaduga hoppadhu'. Apart from the inconvenience - especially to the women / girls, this is very disgusting.

I have seen in many villages the way to 'DHOOVAY' - graveyard is so mucky and leaves a bad impression.

Though I can understand the practical difficulties, why no thought has been spared to have a 'built-in' toilet in the 'Pillay' room in the olden type of 'Thara Mane' [Line house] is foxing. The mindset that there will be bad smell must change.

Organisations like 'SULABH INTERNATIONAL' can help in not only building these toilets, they can also help in building common collecting tanks and use the 'methane' gas produced to put back to community use which is environmental friendly.

Till, every house in every Badaga Hatti, has a toilet we cannot really call ourselves hygienic or modern.


more to follow

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bjaypee
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:16 am Reply with quoteBack to top

To the topic 'Badaga Society must change with changing times' in my website http:/www.badaga.in , Dr. Rajkumar from UK had sent the following comments which I feel, command a wider and serious consideration. Hence, I take the liberty of reproducing Dr. Rajkumar's words verbatum.

Dr.Krishnan Rajkumar writes :

" A bit of my background before I share my views. I am in my late 30’s, grew up part in a small town in Nilgirs and part in my hatti, went on to become a doctor (medical) and currently residing and practising my profession in the UK for the past 13 years. After a few years in the UK, I went back to Nilgiris and got married to my beautiful badaga wife and we have two little gorgeous girls growing up in the UK.

The ever inspiring and passionate wing commander ‘JP uncle’ (who incidentally also happens to be my wife’s dear uncle) airs his views as those of an older generation (’with all due respects uncle’ and trust me he is still young at heart). I will air my views as those coming from a transition generation badaga (who grew up in a hatty, now lives abroad but frequently travels to Nilgiris (opportunity permitting) ,although I have to stress the fact that my views cannot be generalised.

My generation and the upcoming younger generation have certainly had it bit easy in becoming professionals. Our parents had the means and wisdom to spare no efforts to educate us, although this cannot be extrapolated to the young people living in the hatties. During my recent visit to hatty, I was stunned to see nearly all ‘my generation’ age group families moving out to towns to survive economic hardships and offer better educational oppurtunities to their children (and I am sure this is happening in most of our hatties).We are now at crossroads. Majority of our young and transition generations are forced to migrate outside the Nilgiris and the hatty populations are dwindling. Some of our older generation who had previously migrated have grownup children who have only heard the word ‘badaga’. In a few years time the majority of us will be outside the hatties. Added to this some of our people have started selling our lands to outsiders in huge chunks to combat poverty. At this juncture we may start wondering if there is any significance in talking about our culture. The romantic and adventurous amongst us may argue that we are taking our culture with us and establishing it in a different land like our great great forefathers, so that our children and lineage can thrive with minimal hardship. This is a valid thought and it appears our community is heading this way. On this path adapting and changing our culture is warranted. New thoughts and outlooks are imminent and justified.

Now take a deep breath, sit back and think about this;

Our name, culture and heritage has been bequeathed to us by our great forefathers, some visionaries and others simple but resilient men and women. The daring among us can debate if we really deserve this and does this give us the right to change things. Maybe if we had to flee from oppression and fight nature’s elements in a foreign hostile territory to setup home, cultivate the land and bring up a family like our founding fathers did, we would truly understand the wisdom of our existence. Our history dates back to 200-250 years (if sources are right) [ Raj , we can trace our history / origin to about 700 yrs - JP] . Subsequently our fathers and forefathers have battled the elements and the odds in making Nilgiris our home. It is suddenly under threat. The beautiful dream that is ‘nakku-betta’ is being shattered. It now appears that our tradition and culture needs a little bit of tweaking to accommodate modernity in order to survive and progress. Does the ‘badagu’ in us come from our upbringing or by birth? Can someone who is not a born badaga live the badaga way? Can someone living thousands of miles across continents live the badaga way? There are no right or wrong answers to these questions and only time will reveal the truth. We have the responsibility of handing over the dreams and visions of our forefathers to our children so they in turn can pass it on. Only then will we understand the true nature and meaning of our existence.

In the meantime, we need to face and deal with reality.We have to be proactive in bringing economic reforms and development to Nilgiris and the rest will follow. We have to encourage the young to come up with new ideas and communicate with the elders to see reason and accommodate change.I am looking forward to the day I tread back to my hatty with my young family for good and hopefully it is not to far away. Personally homecoming is going to be hard and testing, but then my love for my hatty and all that is ‘badagu’ can endure these hardships ".


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l_santhosh
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:16 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Quote:
So, when I say that the youngsters must be more open what I mean is please remember that there are plenty of suitable girls/boys among Badagas and so make a sincere attempt / search by means of enrolling yourself in the Badaga matrimonial portals or any other means before you choose a life partner from outside.


JP uncle,
(You will know better, but here is my opinion.)
So the concern(in your earlier post) was that youngsters were marrying from outside.
In my opinion, most, if not all, of "other" marriages are decided in college OR the first two years of work life.
Some of our boys/girls fall in love with the "other" in these four-five years. This is the time when they are away from their parents for the first time. They are on their own and therefore their minds are highly impressionable.
In fact this is the scenario for all communities. Solution? Coersion? No way. Perhaps more culture sensitisation. But frankly, I've no clue.

I have not heard(even if there are, will be less) of any case where a youngster was dejected after prolonged search for a match and eventually married the "other".
If one married the "other", the foundation would lie in those 4-5 years.

Therefore, my argument is that there is little, if not nill, space for youngsters to change in this front.

Quote:
the girl is hardly given any choice or a chance to disagree.

Most of our girls get married in their early twenties - 21,22,23,24(max).
At this age, they are just out of college and have barely seen the outside world.
They do not have the time to understand men. All they might desire about their future husband would be filmy impressions - tall, handsome, Maddy-like, etc.
(If any lady disagrees, I would be happy to learn).
They would not know how to weigh a man - is this guy reliable?, is he compatible with me?, how true is he?, etc.

It will be the same with boys when they are 21-24 years. But this problem is only for the girls because they have to(as per their parents wishes) get married at that age.
Boys get married after 27, by which time they are relatively better off in weighing a girl.
In short , most girls get married when they are still girls; most boys get married after they become men.
(Again, if any lady disagrees, I would be happy to learn the reasons).

So considering this, parents have little doubt. Even when they ask the girl(if the guy is okay with her?), the girl is most likely to answer yes. If they say no, most probably it will not be a clearly taken qualitative decision. It would be a decision based on flimsy reasons. [Not all, but most of them].

Quote:
make an all out attempt to speak as well as teach Badaga to their children.

I agree and I strongly believe in that.[/quote]
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gopenath
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:03 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Thanks JP uncle for moving forward and Santosh for keeping the momentum alive.....................
So here we are into the real problems.............. Still a number of houses in villages dont have a toilet......... Poor prevailing conditions. Should we take this as a part of ignorance or a part of neglection? I dont think that people are not aware of the need of basics by the way we see how development( TV, Internet, Cellphones,education,medication etc....) proceeds. But its only the way of neglecting the basic needs. One has to blame himself for indulging in such things. At the same time, we need to know the reasons behind. The major reason is the financial status of the District which they would point without any second thought............
Next, Scientifically speaking, there is nothing wrong in a person marrying the so called "other". But Man has certain restrictions in the name of Tradition, culture, habits and so on.......... which are also important to be considered, without which man cannot be considered a MAN. Science alone cannot fullfill the Humanity. If we speak only on terms of Science, respecting parents and teachers as Gods does not come into picture. Let me not go deep into this aspect now............... could be dealt later.
Next, speaking the mother tongue itself is under trouble. I think this happens mostly only in India. We proudly say" my son or daughter does not know to speak badaga but he or she excels in English,Hindi and so on............ I dont think its possible to revert these people back............. because they really are not bothered about the detoriaration of the mother tongue.
These are only the beginning of problems. There are still a lot to carry on with........................
Are we really developed or pretending to be developed? I invite open discussions...................

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Department of Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics,
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gopenath
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 8:43 am Reply with quoteBack to top

In my opinion, possession of modern education, materials, money, lands and add ons cannot be considered as development. Its only when all these possessions when made use for the upliftment of the society out of humanity, can be considered that there is a significant amount of development. Instead, changing things and mishandling all the possessions for the selfish benefit of an individual and/or his kith and kin cannot be considered as DEVELOPED.
For eg, a badaga marrying the so called "other" is for his or her personal fullfillment or satisfaction and can this individual action bring about any Development?
Leaving the footprints in every field by our Badgas is a change in the trend according to the modern time and shows that we have the capacity to proove our plasticity and sharpness in intelligence which needs a hearty appreciation and applause. But we need to think here whether this transformation has a reflection on one´s own SELF. In what way does this drastic so called " Developmental" changes affect the Development of the SELF? In what way the marvellous achievements of a handfull of people affect the Society or our Community as a whole? (Please note that there are always exceptions.......... and everything cannot be considered as a whole.)
Though we come across so many achievements, possessions, awards, and so on and on.................. and call ourselves DEVELOPED, then why still there is sufferings all around the District? Please note that these questions are for individuals to think about and not to list the problems in the District. We could easily list the problems in the District like
LOW TEA PRICE
LACK OF MEDICAL FACILITIES
LACK OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
LACK OF HONEST POLITICIANS
LACK OF BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES and so on........................
Inspite of having so much of agitations, confusions, difference of opinions, sufferings, pains, I do not really understand the meaning of DEVELOPMENT in this context..........................
European countries are considered as DEVELOPED not because of the reason that technlology is developed, money making is easy, possessing materials is easy............... or something like that. But it is considered as DEVELOPED because, the people dont suffer for basic needs, people really honour the rules and regulations, they think in individual level towards the needs of a country as a whole..................... So DEVELOPMENT has to start from the SELF, then spread to the family, then to the kith and kin, then to the village, then to District, then to a State, then to a country.
So we need not go any where in search of DEVELOPMENT, its in YOU, its in ME. Its in us. Lets think, lets search within, lets start, lets DEVELOP............................

Opinion differs!!!! My apologies if something doesnt sound good.............

_________________
T.S.Gopenath M.Sc., PhD
Institute for Zoology,
Department of Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics,
Schnittsphanstrasse 3,
64287 Darmstadt, Germany.
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sendhil15
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Joined: 13 May 2001
Posts: 32

PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:10 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Well said Gopenath ..I strongly agree to your views
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gopenath
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:40 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you Sendhil, not for appreciating me but for already having the thought towards our DEVELOPMENT...............

_________________
T.S.Gopenath M.Sc., PhD
Institute for Zoology,
Department of Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics,
Schnittsphanstrasse 3,
64287 Darmstadt, Germany.
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